Article: All about mechanical keyboards and why you need one


By

Alex Cocilova for PC World:

Most run-of-the-mill keyboards are rubber-domed, a simple and inexpensive design where the key hits a raised bump and squishes it down (you'll feel the slight squishiness when you type) to register a keystroke. Here's the problem: rubber-domed keyboards require a complete depress, or "bottoming out," to register. That extra effort over an entire workday can lead to hand fatigue, or worse.


Even though mechanical keyboards tend to cost a bit more, their build quality is worth it. Rather than lay down some cheap membrane layers and rubber-domed keys, these bad boys sport heavy-duty switches and functional parts. This makes them durable, and it also gives them tactile feedback that detects a keystroke before the key bottoms out. That means that with a little practice, your fingers are doing only half the work, sparing them a world of hurt.

I'm typing this on a buckling spring UniComp keyboard based off of the original IBM model. I love it. Mechanical is the way to go for the best typing experience, even though they tend to be bigger, heavier, and more expensive.